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Full text of "The Pacer - May 6, 1976"

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I Wintry magazint’s a f ba ted / 

Obscenity statute passed 


• <' K \IU N ) |{ WKI l\ 
News | ditoi 


'>-'.1 / i r» «•" .1 

I’laNH,,! 

\lv. t . 111(1 
f'antr 

■ "i 1"^ !r,^ -hr 

M.l! t I r I , ;! 


I*I.*X b..X 

I Vnlhoiis* 


d-Mlb' 


l .(! 

' .I v uniiii.ii.i i 
p: - >hihi I iri^! (he disf rihol lor "t 
■I'm • ■ i:i maltei within M.( 

<t|m d«*tiiii:|s of Martin 
The i it\ ordinance win* h 
I 1 ' nil 1 1) i! v ft,,- selling 

■ i i ^ I * I. i \ mg exhibiting m 
’ 11 ^ f I I hilt lull lit obscene 
i 1 .«t!t«•! was passed on flu 
'•econd leading March .'if 
m li¬ 
lt shall be unlawful for any 
|»<*rson to knowingly publish, 
ovulate give or sell. or cause 
’ be published circulated, 
given nf sold an> book, 
writing print pic 

Uii e new spa per pamphlet or 
nthei work of an obscene, 
licentious, lewd, libidinous, or 
libelous nature or of a nature 
that tends to corrupt the 
minds of youth or tends to 
corrupt the public morals or 
to publicly exhibit any such 
lewd, obscene indecent or 
libelous picture the or 
dmance states 

i)bscene means i that 
tin- average person applying 


■rd 


l H 


by a Im*’ ot not less than $2 ai d 
not inon ttian $5n the or 
dinance states 



opeland said tie hoped the 


"i ’In 



■ h. 


cp. 


latidit. 
als<. i 


•to 


le.it good 
w hieh will 
•in jHTsonal well 


The ordinance itself was 
drafted following the federal 
i ouri decision in Memphis 
I ennessor Mar tiii o .• \ m 


store owners had the jud 

d g e m *■ r i f to decide what 
mater nils •» • and were not 


staled it 
draw sun. 

St.li d.II d" 

growing i 
material 
concei n 

We MCI 

mater la I 
enhanc 

being < opeland •'.ml W *• do 
not anticipate any problem" 
with enlorcentent (*t die oi 
dinance 

t Ope I anal tiad om*- 
matei lal in tils otf u « a hu h 
had been t h lught at businesses 
ii town and when questioned 
n a 1 1 .i• magazines tie * mi 
idei •»ii otiscene a 11 ei 
. x.iin tiling the | etu |j.ii v 


Pav lo\ ian performers 


dele; 

Hindi :■ k 

I *l.l \ tne 

si lei ed 
peopl. .*• 


V anguard actors 'ready' 
for third Dinner Theatre 


Athletic budget , rationale 
discussed by McGehee 


Hi odiu i 
mph •' it t 


I- athei A ... Pe 

pel t»u i ilic« 
l ’ I Odd A tin play • 
I p|j\ ".ml I lies. 


i Mime' 
.f I de 
' ead\ 
tomgiP 
. father 

I hill S 


In 


dn 


id . 


By K \HK\ KK WKI IN 
News hditor 

Chancellor Larry I 
Mc(»ehee in an infei view 
Tuesday revealed II M - 
athletic budget lor next yeai 
and discussed some of tiis 
v lews of the athletics situation 
facing this campus and tin 
nation 

Met iehee said that the tolai 
athletic budget for men's 
athletics next year will tie 
$(>4(U»48 and the largest part of 
the budget. $405.;W8. will go to 
die football program 


also sei aside toi coaches 
( limes permanent equip 
men! medical insurant 
premiums medical expense" 
salaries stall benefits in g.. 
w ith the salai i«*s tuition toi 
grants and aid student" .i;.>: 
printing costs 

\pproximate|\ 22 t>> 2 ■ [* 
i eill of the football budget 
govs toi s,ilai ies foi , t fieaiI 
i o.u h tom full time assistant 
coaches and two giaduaP 
a"Sis(anfs Mi (iehee com 
merited 

Approximately one halt • 


.r e to lake *h« 
Mk< t tie:', out 
lirodi ick said 
Mi talked I.. »ht 
- ad fold iiim mi 
talk to du- peopl 


'b.ipt 


to 


I! iblitol 
is going 
dow nte 


I icket" 

I ie>da - 
sund.i . " ! 


Mgl:’ 


t >« * I It * I 

I lie. 
[il essii! • 
expand 


to dive 
dlilel u 
d lonai 


i: immense 
sit\ and tlrj" 

• program" 
•conomy and 
•a; t ■ ii ii a i tia" 
isf" Ot afhletu ' 


I>l.o *• of women > athleli< s and 
doing "oinethau: afioiit tfi.it 
. ■ int 1 a "ed • o"t u:d 
I tie ( ompctltive factor ot 
ports themx'Kes the win 
ndi otto lit i\ mg tin 

ot "[Milts up 


I think intercollegiate athletics as w e tun e know n then n . 
n trouble for the future I just feel we are at a crossroads 
nationally I nilateral .u tion by one institution doesn t gain .. 


( tiainrllm I <ii i 


I M t (.. In 


The ('hancelloi said that the 
athletic’s administration will 
receive $9»>.7H2 of the athletics 
budget appropriation He said 
tins money will go for things 
such as equipment and sup 
plies labor National 

Collegiate U lilrth 
\ssociation \< A A dm 
M avel and salaries and "■!a11 
belief its tor Hob (an oil 
assistant at lilef i< " dn e< lot 
and H.n Hn kei stall .dblel n 
ii inner (hie hall of I >r I'.ob 
I’.iy lit ei " dn • •< toi -a 
athletics ",dai \ o also t hided 

The change this \eat in 
!Iiis area lor 1978 77 1 in the 
position ot Spoils Information 
Director is being discon 
l iiiued Md ietiee said 
The ever all football budget 
aIik Ii totals $4U5:t98 includes 
quipment and supplies field 
and stadium maintenance 
team travel game gat* 
guarantees w tin h must hi 
pi omised to i ertain teams, 
and preseason and holiday 
■ neals Money for telephone, 
utilities. I.uindr \ and cleaning 
ot towels and uniforms ft avel 
and contacts lot recruiting 
athletes game officials 
managers student managers 
•d mlnil t ra met s a ml 
whaleve* awards that an 
made to the team toi pai 
ticipation are included m the 
hinigel Motley is also 
allocated for him- and 
l»oslage tor game films bom 
other learns stall travel 
scouting of other teams, office 
supplies, regular meals for tin 
grant and aid athletes pre 
game home meals foi giant 
and aid athletes and book 
rental Hook rental resident e 
hail room icntal for grant 
and aid afhleles and room 
and hoard foi some athletes 
foi the summer are also m 
eluded in the budget Mone\ is 


M 


1 ailipet 1 1 1 v 
"port dem. 

nmey Hi 
til. s pt •! e 


ttie football budget or $191,872 
goes to grant and aid 
students Met iehee explained 
that tins pay lor then mom 
hoard, tuition hook rental 
and medic al expenses 

Mc(iehee ex[)lamed that d « 
budget is based on next yeai " 
[lmjecled SC tee increase and 
this is included in the grata 


ocess dial aimosl 
e.y upon fill 

id .* f. spot ! Ill* 
*• nafuie of dial 
mded that it needed 
• explained that as 
voived and became 
petitivc die lean: 

mate! 1 :lsell up 
io a Iwid to play in 
ami beg.r to nei d 


Having the sport generates 
mole need tor competitive 
fund" Met iehee commented 
I really believe students are 
net mining more participant 
• (fielded He -ard a good 
example ot dus was it<e soccer 
■earn "[>el a t I’lg a i f tiou' 

I m v ci spy lunds 

Mctichee ".ml I Ii, i: 'fie 
tonthall [>i ogriim had been at 
I I’M "Mice the 1920s 
|i s casin to stop something 
onslarted than sornetlung vv idi 
4a oi 5n v ears fnstor v 
Alt (ietiee * omiliented i 
dunk a lot ot it the emphu"i 
>11 .i sport <le[>ends on the 
geogi apliic.il context and 
! i adit ion l nl ike other stales 
I ennessee is v ei v min I, 
looiball oriented 

I he Chancellor commented 
that tie thought public opinion 
had made it cleat that l I’M 
should l*e like ottiei "enuu 
institution" in die state and 
( nut mile then pmgi am 

< ontinued on page ; • ol 


Miut the ordmara 
I it. "or' of w.n 


pmdin 


I odd Ah. , 
[dofessol ol I- 
w he* ,i"ked vv 
pei{orm n 
[Moduet.on i. 
a . h let I v dn 
I Ilk. the 

•dated l'"..n 

..murid s 11 n e 

the lodges! ill! 
Hroadw.iv .iml 
•teve: don* 

I 'a* e said " 

Mothei s |y 

..!'*•! spe, : 

■..I ;h.is< vh«» 


ll. .ill 1 

. ' la fy 

>fie "a 

id costumes to 

r 'he 

: b >' w 

a\- g«‘t 

[May had 

l>eet: ord«*red 

from 



New y or 

k 


- a' a 

ssisfant 

Hat e si 

lated stie thought ti*«• 

igllst, 

it l I M 

Sunday 

matinee would 

also 

iv tie . 

tloso \,> 

■diet a 

good chancr 

■ tor 

\ a 

i.gu.it d 

"Indents 

to attend the 

[>lay 

| ** > r ; ' 1 * ■• 

that ' 

A ho did 

not want to 

also 

['la> 


(■a' ticip; 

ite in the hi 

if fet 

[>la y 

I’odd 

Howevei 

she encour 

aged 


a t >e« m 

-'udents 

To attend the t 

uiff et 

io !' " 

en t.ixed 

■ eal am: 

1 theatre also 



■i.*' I had 

>ugh( the 
ee would 
lid outing 
.dfend 


It will l»e .i good show 
I odd said It " ;i good family 
over-all (i production 
This w ill tie die dn rd a'un/al 
I I'lmei Theati *• pi ♦•setiled hv 
\ angliai d I'bea’ r • ,*.d •*. 

I I'M W.m.e; 


"L 


dn 


I’l.iv box 

I ‘elldioiis 


[H. 


1 Hn 

M.\ I'd- 
.-slodila: (I 
iinance lu 

lt>. M U.- 
Id.i \ box 
an [Hoti.d'l 

n thi" * itv . 
uiv m.igaz 


'*•11 p*. r ,ii x 
stand.it d" "i 
"in Ii a high 
laid star, j 
ike the! • i • 
a he .ti • fr v m 


Buckley guidelines 
force policy change 


:.i dl. 


i t.. Ht ap to each faculty m 
vi ,,)• thi" (juartet as t.• hov 

i: the [Mist th*' grades He 

..rdcr .md Ln'lilt\ u.embers mav . 

• ,i• : t*ei et •( post grade" they 

i,i ,• •[)*• M> s e a t'lnd i (*dmg "V 

D; du-y 1 riight ,i"k toi ,i . 
'| . , ,■ "igned bv ttu si udents 

1 . • 'tlem 'll*' l Igllt to post I 

! die usual manner 
-t udent did net "ig 

in , I - • . a aivei tin grad*- a mi!'! 


. mg 

ides 

the 
t he 


he 


and aid Iigures 

The basketball I 
w hu ll i eceiv cd $‘» t *>u, 
down $94uo trom this ve.u 
Mr (tehee ".ml He exjilamed 
dud I’av ntei tiad i edu. ed du 
numlH*r ol playeis or th* 
liaskethtill team 

Mmoi s[>oi fs at I I M Aim h 
include baseball and tennis 
received an ov ei all budget ot 
$ 44 7 TI tin next \ e.n 
M( < .♦■bee stilted Then budget 
a ill ill* l ease $.’4on due n» 
tuition and i non ien' 

. reas* s 

The a dm mi sfi ,d ix * 1 udge* 
I" (low II $10 oiMi H orn lb* 
[u csent \ • mi ■ M * (,ehe. 
staled He explained this w as 
t hielly due to tfie cutting ot tb- 
position o| N[>orts Intormation 
I >n echo 

Hie luntball budge! i up 
$ IM non next sear Iron tlo- 
. ear M* (.eliee added die 
mm I ease being chief |v I", 
iiiiin i ent and tuition 


tmm dim tiguie "t $4o. 

this v e.ii M* i iehee said I 
amount howevei is not 
. aided in the $M" »>*H 

M« < ietiee >a ill he 'till 
inter, ollegiate alhletu - 
I,- pi i it.lr ri!s 

I lltur e 


athlet 
diem 
tut 111 * 
md g 


s .i" we have krm 
le in trouble lot 
M* ' .ehee . on.men 
e lout i imxi» ns lor * 


Disciplinary action facing 
alleged McCord growers 


Its I D Hot IM i 

I 1111 * * i M I I’a ge I dilni 


n a mil a* t in mg and On in.n ■•■n* ' ., 

mamila* tin mg ot maiimana (dumd admitted ' o' '• 
is a fr*lony The [ninisfrmenl it manut.u tunrig wa- a t» i• 
convicted of manufacturing.is hut commented that there will 


Vl ■ \ 

diree ideas'll*’ t.. 

A. Mild pmbahiv 
• it ui e «juai tci s 
\ft*’i this qua 


•d 


M[MJ" 


I’l a 


mued 
dn oiigf. 

Itch* 11 



tak. 
I tu 




f > * >t t«'(1 '[)ot 


V*»*( f>Sotr> hy r - A 


: 'lg 

id 


C|. k Icy 
•ampus 
"\piams 


id 'he 


>ds 


*f 


1‘T*. 


Clark it out 

is 






la vx 
page *> 


















I*# tfe Two 





Thr Pacer Martin Tennessee Thunflay May* |y 

MaGahaa feature! 


Congress surgery futile; 
euthanasia only answer 



The MiA i utigi rss whufi ’..p 

languishing III mstitui.o' p,j • lot \p,i!' 

'huuld now fx* accorded the s,,:' t pi \ .!«• ^« 
dy mg dog and tx mei. 1 1 u 11 \ put ’ Ir.itf 
I'he group which i* . posed • a 'epi*-v, > 
latives elected hv th« '' nit" ’* e.u ? lad ha¬ 
ul lag ed to MHiit'limi g, ■ In «-j.' -r • -1 ►,.»«. •. ■ 

Aiiht*iji serving. « \ *-r .1 s.'.g,, pui|x*M 

Resolutions ha«» t»een pa's.-a • •1 -< ■ r> <■ s l4 i 

lefts assuredly nil' in .i i' piogi.," ■- '.iii 
l't*en intuited I hi 'An utive tM.c,f ► 
the entire >ear tx ttuir g,,.*.: >, Sad 

.‘.Ollgl ess lias f’aReti . n 1 1 I',I • ml; 

Miannci ol a pet -Mtendaucc ha' U-.m *q»«,!.idi> 

• is has l*»en the custom in pus! >ean .indverv 
tew members have taker, ie a.tiv.-io.e 1 'tj. 
'hat ha\e should tx 1 mi!::! ended fur 'he\ 
scarce ami have tuid little impart 

It is not |u n t this sea! ' group though 'ties 
tins e indeed <*«''•• little that -nei ;!' ent ,*• 

■ fxilition I he com.pi ..I a hulai . ed mni 
dinated student gnvernn.cn: at I I M n.i- 
tiecornc a I a ice and .in siu h shorn.! ?»e dea ! 
With Student'' Vote spaiinglv u !h* fie. 'up, 
lot ‘.ingress memlK’is and most u«i»*r • ~ 
don ! even know who they .tit lepn-M'i ted f>v 
It the hndv IN to e\ is! | hi »U 111 '«M \ e .1 I HI! | 

Since it turn served no purfx.s. ex. ep' a- a 
addition tO lesUII es it 'hoU.li ' 1 >’ .'\ n' I' 

: .might as well t»e dead now tm ai. the ii.. 

doing 

It IN a good pol k > tfiaf student' fiave a v.m . 
in their campus government, and .dto|i'h;ng 
Congress would not decrease that vm« «• If. 
S(iA executive <'abinet w hieh does evei v thing 
new any wav could he expanded s,, tfiat the 
various positions now appointed 


'let ted ones si, \ would tut . '.or a> well as .' 
|o «' v ' Ihe present Mlial: group ol "Ulcers 
C; no' tx r epresentn'" e .id". 1 1 tedlv t'Ut a 
i"up "I " or no .levied m.Iim 1 older n , ould 
>• i " pi «'S« O' jfa Pamir of Indent interests 
’ud«" ! n would a! .east fiave .1 ?»e!tel . fiance to 
no A tm of | u 1 a 1 - de, idiriL ?f,«• v ar ioun 

a pps issues and * he r .'Mill > oind tx- ".ore 
'"it An - r.v oI\ e 11 ec- at all would 
red 'Ha 1 now » \per eru ed 1 1 mgr ess 
s ‘» \ I’r «;n dt id «lev t Kusn s|,Mitl.ir d w f), 1 a 
• ' ■ e | <fS \ , ,■ I'- eN.de; ' 'h.- veal , ailed 
’life a' ' 


SGflCC 


pledged to pi, m 1 . . 
II.n . ham on ,f do 
a' d Moddal d ' ft- 
■v I -I d. ml 'led! V 


n la 1 to the "lies 1 
It 1 n hard to pi v isu 
*’" sv III, - tl , h a (lira 


depal t' fill 


v poi nt ica l! 
to tmd Itself 



.' u pad group 


' ’..1 v 1 np no purpose 

'..IN ■ allaged to exist 

'Ilfput toi til, ent 11 e Veal 
a p 1 eed and flier'em . ouln 
' «'V !. a veai alfei \ ear 
•sing .ir 1 v a ones no w Iiv 
" "" dci though it tli. 


edit"! ;a i-s riot to ride 
t \tter all one , annot 
' all I'Ut dead ' v w a 


\ ues<*£\ 

K*rr"V 

e-^o *<* 


Previous planning problems 
may teach valuable lessons 


Kudos 

given 



There are Neveral valuable e'soii' n, 
learned trom study ing the e\olution o| the ew 
PF Complex traced last week hv In da. k 
M ays vice chancellor tor developmen' 

The foremost lesson ol course is one of 'm, ., 

Ioresight Although it is admittedly difficult m 
foresee inflationary construction trends rh«- 
deletions from the originally planned huildnip 
ore of such a nature that (.>«k» r planning w,.' 
obviously a factor There will fx- no 
»»urse. making the f leldhoime again fa 
ioi next year's bask»*thali gai- es hu: there w ; 

• iso he no outdoor ira. k or high div mg t.oar d 
\dd to tiiese outright suhtrai Hohn 'f ; , t um , 
such areas as pool depth lighting and pair 
>' p and one can see that the end pio.iui 1 w 
t*e vastly interior to thr- origiria. .oiurpta.!, 
Ketlei planning could certamlv fia\> aiiev ,.a■: 

' any of these problem n 
A nothei Irv'snn to he anuned i> on. 01 pi.,, 
'icaiity Ihe Olympic N|/i -w ann.a.g pool wd 
t>e nice certainly hut its value toi 'he , an pu» 
s 'juestionafde 1 'here ,n ( | \\ wann m t 
team and the dor" poo in ohviouslv n am 
more convenient tor carnpUN m-n, den's n, ,v, 
•Since commutei students w,| not us. *t,. poo 
-that much its prim ai y v alue w ;li appai em.v ,n. 
as a classroom The huilding ol the dor- poo 
"hviouslv takes 'he Ijstre ,f 'he pooi - ,' 


' " " u ' ' ' !! I'"' tant it points f.. tin 

''' 'I h»i he'tei .: a « ampiis eommunicalion 

It" "VP I • of t'ii i'll rip .1 S J">« I immi domed swim 

p l’°" A hen a new "ivm,|iii N»/ed one is only 

' A " ' aw a 1 , in o! tut n ii- quality 

1 that also needs Jo |>e examined is 

’ ’ ’ ’ atof a ho the |a. n it v m toi The pr»‘sent 
•*' ill!| e' e . losed mm h ..f fhe Mine w fieri 
'f uiient> a.hi' to ijn, them d. -p,.,. th. lad tha' 
f• ere are uhv ioun|\ plenfv o: faculty memliei ' 
. -t.rfl the huildings. and there is little reason 
f" tieliev. tflingN All; he hetlei when the new 
’ "perm It fhe 1 oinplex s , losed over 
1 t".vded a it f. at file! n ’ea" members the 
f 1 elent n a :|| not heiadif I’tai s 'liould begin 
"" v ' msiife tfiat flu fai dit • o open as much 
' i"'S'if He 'h» 01:111 , - ’ ndenf f.ody \\ itfl a 

lip* p"t ’ o of ■ .OX ■ Vi‘,1! N ii:. lease slated 

" ■ " "n'f 1 1 ,o 11 ns|s 'fit 'indent' ilesn v e 

Ml Ilf illt V 

It o wmdoin ,,| • Aft hund.iig the < oinplex is 
d'hatahle 1! not now a narot |Millil What 1' 

1 s'.'ii! no. however ,s tfiat the I iiiversily 
' 1 ♦•»* 1 1 /< the mistake' in ffie planning ol 

fa I1 , d: up ami . 1 \ old f ill in e 1 ui rein es such 
■ i 0,11 i/at ioi coupled win. expanded athlete 
pp"! i u' 1 f !*•' to! ad 'f llderi? ' could make the 
'I'gfifiV moil p.da*.ihio to an econnma allv 


** ilo . dm. 

1 

< Ollgl at III. 

liioii' a 

► In loin 

f-astei 

It 1 atuina 

1 't uden 



'-i-"*'', 1 .' ■ 

oi the •' 

qi Iasi a* 

•ek 

1 .*lt« i Had* 

•ii 

sxiNianl Pi 

i*l essoi 


Apology 

issued 


Week unqualified success 


The unqualified Mines* Ir.tei • .1 rion., 
V\eek is an indication if this ovei ’ s p<,ionf;a 
when ntiagmativelv planned and ex*-, ated 
In its first v**ai ol Npunsorsfnp »h* lute: 
national Program headed hv |»i 
• John Kisterhoid fia' shown ,r ohv n-u* ah ;;’ 
to manage this event I' is untoi tm ate tha* tf„ 
illness of I)i Muriel I. pre, pi'a'ed 

th * 1 shift ol sponsorship Iron the n , L ' 
language *f«‘IIr'?■ 1 • sponsor tor *h* past 
two years, to th*' Internationa, I’i .pi.,-- mi- 
this situation could prove to fx h«*n* , l!. i.n h 
its very name th*' Internationa, I'-ogr e s . 
logical choice for managemen' >>t m.in over.' 
and it tfus year’s per tm <• S |g: ,.| 'f ; ;np 


.. ' International Week a ill « ontmue to he 

•' " pot tant par! ol tfus I mv *-rsity s program 

Ihe week a, is fugfiligfited hy a banquet an 
nlrrr.ntion.il exhiMt a s,„ , matcli and a 
lem"iistra!,on of '»-|f d*-tense t«*ehmques Ml of 
't.es. af lair ' .veto well affemiid. f f 1«■ haiuju* 1 ! 
Mining away " anv p*-opl. and the great 
"f act viti*-' olfei e.j 'how ' .1 Wealth «*! 
tnaginafior <»• die par' of tf,o planners 


hiNferhoid a: 
a'!"Ma I'rogla 


"d for firmginp 

• t M . and 1 nitur e to 


• VlLL 1/alrLiL. 

Hated \ 11 \ trier n an IU I lie \ sso* piled ( *>lleaint* I'rrs 


t 


fCPA 


if h \l I* rn.r. 

> dltni 


KUtf NfHWhl l\ 

New s h dito* 

Hl( K NORTON 
Npe< ial \ssignments h ditor 

h I) Hot OK I 

f ditonal f*age f ditor 


Ed'tOr opinions »• ’ • » . 

»Qr e+mtril with .he n**-i '•< •*-» 

Columns ' *h» , nl 'he 4 >h 

'»«,•»% *0 »<Ji*Of yhp./ifi nr y.grrd ’vt 

. rsrr v* the r ,Qh* no* to pud A*' hr, o, 1 
T hr f (Juni or Ad■»>.,, ny 

orl'Onri »dvo»ti»rf>g rrofr^r-'r’ ,r% 
wart.n Tron |^?*| Php.*r »• vie -44 


It MONO \ V\ l-l « H 
Kiisini ss Ma im g»-i 

/ II Mil! Mi UUIIII 
I opv I ditor 

W \ It HhNM M rft 
sports f ditoi 


It K M \KO < III s || IN 
I a* ult v \ d v isor 


I o lire rdiloi 

\I f *■ 1 ' u. h . on t rov. 1 s v 
"v o' < oimm Iasi week I 
d'oi ■ u i hie ami sincei e 
apo'op to Mat k 'n t«*r luig 
mendHTN ol fim campaign 

M < . a 1 • ! 'Uppoi Iris mi 

Cl filllg a. ( II'.|t loll' I mad*' Mi 

.i't Thursdays I’ucei 

\- V "II 1 *-. ail I IJU* St lolled 

",a’ Mark sin Imp c,r < n 
1 . 11 " s|o.Ida 1 (1 III . 11 , i v ent to 

n Tfio Sunsluin' I i.'krt 
I'l '"I 'O 'hi' I eeent . \ lection 
I a ' a e: |, > the quest 10 , 
I' h ' but not mi if), sense 
1 ' 'o ded I also questioned 

dal k o I,*' live, UI e and 
U s;i| • of nr .self Mai k I' not 

!|sr< u: O , 1 ''id II.'.sill «• of f.i!!; .c.t 

■ ' I nav < 1 e« en1 1 found 

by in. alter and only alter I 
had talked with Huss Stoddaid 
on two separate, candid o, 

■ asioris. prior to the column 
'x-ing pufilished 

I I eg 1 r? that I a . 1' i'l' 

tiu rned and misled to fKdieve. 
hv I; 1 iss Stoddard "t Mar k - 
ability to piMorm as \ i,,. 

I ’ro'idf id oi s<, \ S'01 Ida 1 I 
ml lit '.'h .0 nl f 1, n ow 

approaefiment to Sterling 
prioi to .1 trip to \N ashington 
nh"ij' t»emg 1 1- running mat* 
t 'ii ket V cor ding 
Mai k ' 1' V a I '.'! loiJs rjouhf 
'"•11' t|)«' ' II k* t at'.rl h 1' 

' mi tun. and A..uld p'iv* u 
0 10 'floupln c d let Stoddaid 
know later Alter Stoddards 
retun from Washington it 
' a- tl in am! mil. It en 'ha’ 
Mor ling < ante n, Sf l .*lilar d m 
• vm. t ie* t,| kilo a t„ 

• hi <1 ll a iff, '.in mi 'fie 


N'oifdar d . 1 it.. .Iv s|. „• 

I■ o k n o 1 ji . oi;\eis,|iimiN 


' uiumi W hv Uus failed to 
ov e.d ' hose oid of tn*i la- ts f,, 

• l a ui>. *M tain 

I III* e,e:v 'eg,." ' f, s 

-'ok. I ...I, and too tha 1 

loo to ot r.uni Oi,' 

• " ,p|e|. pn tm , m f m 1 :. so If 
1 -ci loudv felt 'f,h« | had a 

' ••liable -OIII ce 111 

Huss Stoddard and tfiat he 
had been completely open in 
*'\cry tfimg he said to me Thus 
mv tiusf and belief in Mod 
dard ignited the explosion lot 
which I was iinfxMiafily wrong 
on Mark s fwfialf 

1 no V 1 eg| et dial I v ot.'d Ioi 
lliiss stoddaid afti'i his mi 
'•'halo denial ol Hi. quot' 

\ f>' *-. fit s 'hr . | IM q„. 

1 "h H' said 1* I heard if I 
know |i fo lx- true I’ossihlv 
siod'lar • 1 leol, Ih.«t If In. not 
t. Mv fig the quote fiis wm king 


r»*latuMis w itfi Mark would f>. 
mdered Mfer talking witfi 
Mbieehl on Saturday mormnp 
and Sterling Friday afternoon, 
both feel that Ihe accuraev m 
oi ofj.ifjle | vv ill not 1 elra. t tin 1 
quote It is true and | woui.i 
• ei hav «• quoferf Kuss u ne 
had not said it I admit mv 
nine's should have been 

.in else And I admit to 

v |oui naiist ic 'tandai ds ai *• 
l.o ti" any but my own 'i et 
I . tnisnleied Huss Stoddard. 

source fnghlv credihl. 

d horu'st or I would have 
''vei (|Uo|ed 

In < losing ifi*' tennis 
barque' wa- misplaced 
nn'ailed lot and only i umoi 
I deep regret t< you Mark 

I'.nil I inkle 

Congress 

defended 

I <• Ihe edllol 

so Mi Klists Stoddard. S(iA 
I e'ldenl elect and present 
^ 1 > • I’ 1 . ' 1 <1 *■ n l think' 

1 ongi ess is a w orthlesv. 

pi "Up ol students Surely y on 
n‘s| Mi stoddaid I)on * v.m 
kiio •. that would frreak mv 
lea 1 Mofliei s heai t fo hear 
'iei 'on railed wm thless 
I am the In st hi admit that 

• ongi rs' 1' not |H‘rlecI W« 

.1 *• Had 0111 good points and 

• 11 b«nl points and so ha' thi' 

c.c Si; \ \ ice PiOsidenl 

s ui 1 we had a great Ilenrv 
'.1 onn conceit but Satui day 
1 Mghi ' I - re*' 1 oncer I. on vv Inch 
' 4 <ioo was pent tell Hat on its 
Me. Mi Stoddard please i 
ake , redil a fiere . unlit is | 
dm- With the $7 Jon Si i.\ had m 
he bank and the money w, 

• mild have mad. Ii., tick*" 

■ i'l'' we could have had a 

coliph ol top fiand' and Iwl 
/epplin ,.s w a 1 m up 

I hit in. the past S(, \ 

■ led ion I suppoi led v «»u mi 
\ mi' 1 an 1 lor President Now I 
Aondei Alia' kind o| power 

.razed student we have 

■ let led to 1 epresent l TM lor 
Mi* upcoming yeai I' seem 

" no that ail this power has 
go-.,, to voui head I cei tamlv 
op*' 1 fi«*re is no truth to the 
1 uinor that your head had to 
f>e greaser! down t)efore you 
could enter tin Humamiie' 
Kn.idmg Mi Stoddaid v.m 
have Ix'e etecteri President 
t the s <, \ .it t I M not King 
"r < /AH of PTM 
\iuix \llison 


my other coi 
pi'edom 
eristics ol t| 
ocietv 

Per fi .r p s 

latemeni 


"Mat' cliarac 
file \ Vne/iielai 


Comments 

attacked 


I <> 1 lie < ditoi 

I' Iasi week' P.u et 1 .111- 
• eorg»- wa interviewed and 
h« mad. some pointed 
tatem.-nts about the role o| 
' ""'en in Venezuela Tiles. 

I a lem«• 11 1 s 11, a v 1 .0 

Misleading because they an 
opinionated rather than 
author ized statements 

1 ieorge say s that th«* woman 
n.is .1 much lowei role m th* 

\ ••ne/uelaii so«-iety which is 
iM»t tn/c fx'. aus*' 4 u, s*x'i* i tv 1 
1 'asod on Ih«* i./iily and Ihe 
duel _^ole oi the woman is t,• 
a 1 so her lamily II th«- 
loundat loqol 0111 socielv nth, 
Miuilv . and the women s i«,|e 
1 maintaining and pe, 
pet 11.ilmg ill*- lamilv then how 
• an 1 ,eor g< s.iv tfiat tfus 1 ol, 
s lower than Ifie man s ' 


v * • 11. • /11»■ I a 11 sru-iet v w hiefi 
not In/, fx'. aus*' iui vm'icl' 
1 '.ised -ui th*- l./uily and 


Perhaps (i eor g e's 
sialemtMii concerning .1 
elatloiisfnp with Vi'iiezmlan 
\o",an w fn*r.■ the man must 
ok. a 'Chediile with fiei 
parents is his own ex 
penence Sure a girl’s parents 
are interested in their 
daughter and who she is 
dating, hut f don’t think the 
general rule is that the Ixiy 
must punch m a time card and 
punch out alter his two hours 
appointment time His 
description of dating 
piocedmes was him orolls to 
, Ioi ol tin \ ene/uelaii 
Indents 
Mai i.t I ha/ 

Headline 

corrected 

I *» I II*- editor 

The column hear! in last 
I week s soccer article was in 
M'lroi when it referred to the 
VlM Noceer learn as the 
Pacers The PTM soccer team 
y•' self supporting group of 
'undents playing live game as 
.1 clul) sport The team is in no 
way affiliated with the 
ilhletics department and they 
do not vmsIi to be designated 
as the Pacers 

I I’M played Knoxville last 
weekend, losing the game 4 - 2 . 
and though the team lost, they 
performed a spectacular 
exhibition bet ore an excited 

• rowd ol students and rallied 
m the second hall to dominate 
'ho gam** However, equally 
impressive was the crowd 
attending the game other 
teams m the SF< report that 
ui average crowd at their 
home games was between 2 "* 
and >n people P TM should be 
proud ol the support they have 
given their flist year soccer 
team with crowds Indween 
i'Hi 4 imi ui attendance Soccer 
is a new spoil and perhaps 
w Iff) more opportunities for 
homo games there will lx- 
more growth lor soccer as a 
popular sport here at Martin 

II you attended last week's 
game then you probably 

1 aught a little ol 111 *’ Soccer 
Fevei The game is exefting 
Quick action, low scoring, and 
lull ol bruises. the ex 

• itemont is easily transmitted 
bom players to spectators 

I h* soccer team needs a home 
.ind linaiu lal support for basic 
operating expenses Perhaps 
s < >\ or even Ihe ad 
ministration will see the 
advantages of supporting 
soecei at .. relatively low 
oxpense because the PTM 
team is conqietitivc with any 
team around and th*’ num!>cr 

of soecei fans is growing 
'filch \lexandei 


Critics comfort by HANK WILLIAMSON 

Ihrdirr v .,11 members of the faculty picket 

Nt , h , , , untemporary the stadium A group 

lomedv Mo .ctum 11 June capitalist cheerleaders g0 
lht . .,| as s he absurd around selling popcorn and 
production VS alter Gate s beer to the faculty. while a hip 
novel Ml ‘ho ( haiuellor s ia/z band move onto the 50 
Men The cast u! actors will hardline Students hear all the 
I km form at no cost t*ecause the ihe commotion and pile into 
\ angord Ttieatrc t'ompanv the stadium bleachers for the 
lias granted them pardons d excitement of it all. and for the 
they will perform as them t*-er At one end of the field i* 

selvc' in then respective a group ol poets reciting their 

iules Hal IV Mat.afiaa wil. p*»etry to the background of 
-ia, n ihe hi 111 a 1 t otid imngo drums . while a group 
demanding tolt*' ol t fian ol poets reciting their poetry 
cellor alias Athletics King to the backgound of bongo 
hacking him up will fx Jed while a group of beat artists 
Quciicil who plavs the ar e drawing pictures 0 I 
easedi oppmg sabntogci Maiding on dart boats and 

hang' around th* men ' selling them at 15 each A 

avatory tapereordi g the |<nT( drill team decides to 

siihv.. i.nv .1 Nations o| |om m the fun. for 

student' and facultv while q„. Bicentennial effect, and 

•bey use tlu- la.ilities march across the field 

Newcomers to the stage and 

playing m . hoice 1 tiles are singing "The Battle Hymn ol 
Cabinet meiiifH-rs MacKntin* the Republic" to the cadence 
and c.iral ol Hup two. hu^three. etc ” 

Director K«i Raiding wisely \ freshman in the school of 

iis*‘s many . lose ups of architecture is drawing 

Mat;aha.* s wiry tao to plans in chalk on the thirty- 

portrav th« i agonizing vard line to convert the 

siii in m a g < of stadium into a self-sustaining 

leg is 1,11 iv * battles to per greenhouse, so his roommate. 

IKduate loot ball at the 'ul> a Biology major, can grow 

sidised state university The African orchids year round. A 

vulgarity of the play is that limosine pulls into the 

.chile these legislative efforts stadium, and you'll never 

:ire going on the state guess who's in it Ed Balding, 

imversity is crumbling into of course, who is dressed upas 

ui educational and cultural a tyrant and he sets up his 
lepression \ disgrunted own puppet show 


The wormn m \Vnezuela 
have otliei important roles in 
ocietv Ihev arc m 

prob’ssional lields govern 
ments. and every other 
as|M*cl oi lib- Contrary t*» 

1 .*’<*rg*' ' s|at(Miient The 
man is the person who 
decides .veiything. the 
womai and Ium husband 
'ogelliei m.iko Ihe decisions 
«o’ .'eriiiii. then home and 
oily Hum «• may lie a 
percent age o! I a m 1 1 ies m 
\ Inch < .<’»n ge statnnents 
hold Irijc but these conditions 
.1 «■ also present in a similai 
.Aten! Ill the l lilted States 01 
• my other count 1 v I'hev are 


V diitortl I hrdirr »,ll 
1,1 .. . i.nlrmpordry 

loined' MtiiK'lmi'' .., June 
,h.- |.la* - absurd 

production ANaller Mate s 
mive! All ihaiuHlor* 

Men The cast of actors will 
|k*i tnrm at no, ost t»ecause the 
A angord Theatre Com pan v 
has granted them pardons it 
they will perform as them 
selvc' in then respective 
roles Hal 1 v MaGahaa wilt 
- (a , „ the bullaid t’U 

demanding toles ol l fian 
cellor alias Athletics King 
Backing him up will fx Jed 
Qmiicil who plavs the 
easedi oppmg s.* h"t og. 1 

fiang' around th«- men v 
lavatory tapereordi g the 
siiliv 1 t s 1 v.■ . o 11 v 11 salions "I 
student' and lacultv while 
th.y use the laulities 
Newcomers to the stage and 
playing in choice loles. are 
C.ihinet memfx’rs MatUntire 
and Cara I 

I hrector Ed Raiding w iselv 
uses many . lose ups of 
M a‘.afiaa s wiry face to 
portray th« i agonizing 
sell 111 m a g » of 
leg|s|.,|iv* fialfles to per 
IKduate football at the 'ul> 
sidised stale university The 
vulgarity of the play is that 
while these legislative efforts 
are going on the state 
university is crumbling into 
an educational and cultural 
depression \ disgrunted 
group of students and (acuity 
fx’gm a cold war of protest by 
threatening to Ixiycott football 
activities and refusing to pay 
the imposed student activities 
lees 

When MaCahaa appoints 
MacEntire and Cara I t‘> head 
up this team of consultants, 
and their phenomenal 
salaries are disclosed. 


AAilliairson % review of (hr 
pi.i\ " Ml (ho < haneellor's 
Men" will ^have the 
<mu Indi g part two in next 
week’s paper. 


Editorial criticized 


SGA Dateline 


I here w ere a lot of 
dissapointed and angry peopl. 
in the S(, \ oft lees last 
Thur'sday when w. all openeil 
■ •ui Pacer's to Ihe editorial 
page and began to read tli< 
editorial on the free SCiA 
outdooi concert It's really 
disappointing that we couldn't 
Imally make il through a veai 
without the Pacer 

unreasonably criticizing S(,\ 
entertainment events in ad 
vance belore giving them a 
chance to be suceesslul and 
thereby often having the 
Paeei become a ma |or 
contributing lactor to t h • 

lailmc they predicted 
Overall during mv tern ol 
"Mice in the absence ot an 
active Congress they have 
Idled a very needed role as a 
check on tile executive 
Inancli However, last week's 
editorial won very 
unreasonable in its criticism 
dnd was not in the least 
. onstni. live 

First ol all. I don’t believe 
I’acci can reasonably make 
the claim that the majority 01 
students would have preferred 
a concert with just one lug 
niiini'" performer This would 
have meant that the concert 
would only have lasted a 
couple ol hours Also, it could 
only have featured one type nl 
music S(, \ tell that instead 
the student body would enjoy 
a variety ol music, spread out 
over an entire evening with a 
festival atmosphere 

Why did we feel that the 
students would support this 
type <»f event ’’ The large 
''Indent support Ioi past 
I'FDs and the Folk Fair 
si’O'.e.l that an entertainment 


by JOHN KERNODLE 

• vent ..I this type could be a 
mi.ijoi success The Pater 
t'cll lias often praised these 
event' and lamented their 
death S(iA’s idea was to 
return to the type of even! 
hat RFI) was in years past 
when a variety of quality 
groups were booked 

I must also take issue with 
the Pacer’s claim that the 
music was not ol high quality 
Does the Pacer feel that to 
plav good music a band has to 
cost >4.000 or $ 5 . 000 ° "Well- 
known "Popular,” and 

"expensive” do not mean that 
fhe iiuisn will be of high 
quality anymore than "little- 
known means that the music 
\ ill U* poor A year ago Henry 
Cross was a "little known" 
i»erloimer in the same price 
•aiig. as the acts on last 
Saturday's free show Anyone 
wh ' attended the concert 
knows tfiat it featured good, 
quality music Pavlov's Dog. 
a hu h w as the object of humor 
1 last week's editorial car 
'oon play ed a really excellent 
'et They are a group which is 
last on the rise and a great 
deal will be heard from them 
n th*- future 

Saturday’s concert was a 
success in terms of quality 
music, if not in terms of 
a eather » onditions and at¬ 
tendance Some 700 to 1 . 00 “ 
'Indents who hraved the cold 
enjoyed some great music. If 
:S 'hame that the bad 
weather kept some from 
attending It is even more of a 
•‘'hame it others stayed away 
'•ecause they were convinced 
!>• th*- Pacereditorial that the 
•vent was not worth their 
Inn*' 


QsZWB WQiL 

IFEELRflTO>j]r YOU GOTTA 
/Alt'XX) iWWKril C>E 3 oK\M 6 
lock efintN koo^Tp j_ uoul0wT 

\ SESWias kOTOTHATlM I OOfcT 

/ (tK V)e_speiW 




VtlL.So /Out 
K.IODO wHf.TS'.t WE 
VOK P. look SEt 2 \T 
OoDLJ OUT 


COUGHTOft 

" ^ MoctoR. 
PLtftSE 



S' 













Hit'I'acer Martin Tennessee,Thursday May6 ,1976 

Stoddard discontent 
with school support 


HIC K NORTON 
Xisignments Kditoi 

SGA president -elect Russ 
Stoddard said Monday he was 
ver > disappointed and upset at 
ihe turnout at Saturday's 
concert, blaming this on 
coverage given to it by The 
•‘a<er along with student 
apathy and bad weather 
1 was extremely pleased 
w, th the groups themselves,' 
Stoddard said They did a 
wonderful job 1 was disap 
pointed however, at the 
turnout There were a lot ol 
things on campus this 
weekend, but ^veryone still 
went home 

"Students are always 
complaining about nothing 
going on during the weekends, 
so we do prov ide them with an 
excellent weekend and they 
still go home.' lie continued 
Stoddard said there were no 
decent " headliners available 
for the concert and that he had 
tried to get any that were 
The Pacer seems to think a 
group's talent is measured by 
the amount ol money 
received," he stated "The 
price of a group is measured 
by what songs a group has in 
the top ten " 

As an example. Stoddard 
stated that earlier he could 
have gotten John Sebastian 
here but now his price had 
more than doubled due to his 
one song, the theme song of 
"Welcome Back Kotter ." 

"Talent is not measured by 
price. but by com 
mercialism." he stated "The 
editorial in last week's 
I’acer was unfair and an 
example of shoddy jour 
nalism 

Stoddard admitted he 
thought that maybe UTM 
students did want a single big 
name performer but there 
were simply none available at 
the time of the concert He 
said any other time would 
have been just as inconvenient 
as far as being in conflict with 
other events while at the same 
time big name performers 
would be just as hard to come 
by 

According to Stoddard and 
present SGA Secretary of 
Finance, Russell Day, at its 
peak- there were ap 
proximately 400 people at the 
concert at one time. This was 
during the latter part of the 
concert They also estimated 
that from 700-800 students 
came in and out of the concert 
throughout its entirety. They 
announced that 30 outside 
persons paid to gain entrance 
to the concert. 

"I was extremely pissed at 
the turnout," Day said "The 
weather was a factor. It was 
cold. plus, the rain was a 
factor, but that’s avoiding the 
issue Not only did people 
not show up. they just didn’t 
stay here this weekend 
anyway. I’m disappointed in 


the whole school student wise 

"I disagree with last week's 
editorial. he continued 

The Pacer reviewed the 
groups before they even got 
here Still though. I'm more 
disappointed at the damn 
>tudents than the damn 
University There was really 
some good music here this 
weekend For the price, you 
couldn't beat it with a stick 

Stoddard continued by 
saying he had specifically 
asked for a security officer to 
remain within the concert 
area behind the stage to help 
watch the equipment He said 
the security officer did more 
than what he had been asked 
to do 

"We specifically asked for 
security officers behind the 
stage." he explained "As it 
turned out. he spent more time 
looking for contraband instead 
of protecting equipment " 






Jumping juvenile 

A participant in last Thursday’s Special Olympics completes 
Ihe standing broad jump as part of the competition for the 125 
to 150 persons present in the Pacer Stadium area Other 
scheduled events included track and field, gymnastics, and 
swimming competition 


Athletic . . . 


• Continued From Page One) 

"I just feel we are at a 
crossroads nationally, 
McGehee stated "Unilateral 
action by one institution 
doesn't gain a lot " He said 
that action was needed at the 
state and national level on 
college athletics 

McGehee said one alter 
native the University has 
always wanted was to be able 
to join the Ohio Valley Con¬ 
ference. but they had been 
refused on the basis that the 
conference did not want to 
expand. 

“Even that does not solve 
the overreaching financial 
picture that is down the road.’ 
McGehee commented. 

The Chancellor said that 
compared with other in 
stitutions in Division II of the 
NCAA conference he thought 
our athletics budget was 
lower 

"For institutions of 2000 to 
10,000 students our athletics 
budget is low for the ones I’ve 
l>een able to find.” 

McGehee said he thought if 
UTM cut its athletic budget 
before other institutions it 
would hurt the institution. 

"It seems to me you have 
lo make a value judgment 
about the overall effect on the 
institution," McGehee stated 
“1 can’t find the data that in 
dicates that the institution’s 
academic quality would not 
suffer if football was dropped. 
He said the data he had seen 
seemed to say the opposite. 

UTM receives $250,000 from 
state appropriations for 
athletics through the THEC 
lormula and McGehee said 
there are probably 100 student 
athletes receiving financial 
aid in all sports and UTM 
receives an average student 


Wonder 

why ? ! 


< ail :>»:-?■> n 


Why was it not publicly an¬ 
nounced that the movie 
"Lenny" would be shown in 
the KdNullec Xuditoriuni 
instead of the ballroom 
Sunday? 

"It was on the posters the 
week before and on the 
newsletter that it would be 
shown in the KdNuEc 
Auditorium. " Steve Cox. SGA 
President . said 
Why does it say juniors and 
seniors will be #fflen 
preference for R.A. positions 
and sophomores are chosen? 

"Preferences are given to 
juniors and seniors liecause 


they generally have more 
experience, but in some cases 
sophomores are more 
qualified and are chosen," 
Earl Wright. assistant 
director of housing, com 
mented__ 

Lost 

garnet braclet, 
jewled pin, 
apple necklace 
REWARD! 
Sandy Hearn j 
McCord Hall 


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appropriation for each student 
of $1350 from THEC. 

"I think it pretty well comes 
close to paying for itself in 
that aspect." McGehee 
commented The Chancellor 
said that in addition to THEC 
funding, the athletics budget 
receives money from gale 
receipts, game guarantees. 



medical claims, concessions, 
ads from programs, and from 
renting the football field 

"Roughly it’s costing us 
somewhere between $ 100,000 
and $140,000 in unrecovered 
income," McGehee said. He 
said that the money for the 
additional funding comes 
from the administrative side 
of the budget and not the 
academic side 

"We don’t have some ad¬ 
ministrative offices that other 
institutions have," McGehee 
commented "The immediate 
cessation of football I don’t 
think would mean money 
immediately available for 
administration or faculty." 

He compared dropping 
football to dropping the school 
of Liberal Arts and releasing 
the money for another 
department. 

"I think you can use 
athletics lots of times for 
deficiencies in other areas 
without looking at the other 
factors that cause these 
things,’’ McGehee com 
mented He said some people 
did not sometimes consider 
that instead of cutting the 
faculty to increase salaries 
they were keeping the faculty 
members He said inflation 
and stabilization of enrollment 
had Iso affected the funding 
for the University. 

"The high cost of football 
has actually increased in 
terest in other sports," 


TOtuttecL 


TENNESSEE SOCIETY OF POETS 
is compiling a book of poems. If you 
have poems and want 

our selection committee to consider 
it for publication, send your poem 

and a self-addressed stamped 

envelope to: 

THE 

TENNESSEE SOCIETY OF POETS 

P. 0. BOX 6304 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 37401 


Comedy reviewed 

Faculty critic by Walter Haden 


McGehee said He said full 
funding for other sports are 
prevented but other sports 
still begin and a democratic 
and participatory emphasis is 
generated 

"As long as it’s competition 
lor the sake of fun a lot more 
people are going to par¬ 
ticipate," McGehee stated. He 
said he was not absolutely 
convinced that it would be in 
the best interest of diversity to 
kill major sports funding 

"It seems to me very 
healthy and desirable for 
there to be an awful lot of 
recreational outlets for a wide 
spectrum of people," 
McGehee said and added he 
thinks it would be nice if UTM 
could have 10 or 15 in¬ 
tercollegiate sports funded at 
not over $3000 

He said if a sport was 
created out of desire and if the 
desire failed and the sport was 
dropped nobody would be 
hurt 

"There again unilateral 
action is not possible," 
McGehee said He explained 
that other institutions were 
needed with this system for 
competition 

The Chancellor said that he 
has noticed an interest being 
expressed by presidents of 
other universities in how 
athletics is funded and 
national sports organizations 
are also examining the 
question of athletics in the 
future. 

McGehee said that a vote 
was taken at the January 
meeting of the NCAA for 
funding on a financial aid 
basis in Division I, and came 
close to passing Division I is 
the superpowers such as Notre 
Dame and Alabama. 

"I think that was the most 
telling indication that people 
are very concerned," 
McGehee said He said that he 
thinks if the next few years 
can be spent in laying out what 
options are available and 
selecting the best options and 
by 1980 some action might be 
taken 

UTM's athletic budget in¬ 
creased $800 overall next year 
over what was allocated this 
year. 

"1 really want to applaud 
Dr Pay liter for the cuts he 
made in holding the line." 
McGehee added 


Just oft campus. Charles M 
Shulz s precocious brain 
children stepped out of the 

Peanuts" comic strip to 
make last Thursday and 
Friday evenings not just 
another weekend Martin 
For a sparkling, fast paced 
ninety minutes, student actors 
.it the* Interlaith Center added 
animation and credibilits to 
deceptively simple lines 
echoing universal themes, 
sometimes of Socrates and 
Jesus 

Directed by Kay kimmel. 
the Clark Gesner Book, music, 
ind lyrics for You're A Good 
Man. Charlie lirown provided 
a happy vehicle for acting, 
singing, and dancing talents 
hat could play well on 
Vanguard or Opera Theatre 
Workshop stages 

Ed Phillips musical 
direction and Professor file 
Grasfeder’s choreographs 
were as right lor the cartoon 
surprise as the precision 
sensitivity of Mike Godsey's 
technical direction, and 
Barbara White's costuming 
were equally on target 

Jack Bishop's mellow tenor 
and expressive face 
egislered the many moods of 
I Aery man-Charlic Brown 
Soprano Elaine Benderman's 
auburn haired Lucy ran the 
scale musically and 
dramatically from sugarplum 
to Holly Golightly grownup 
bitchiness. making one 
wonder why her acting in 
campus productions has been 
limited lo minor roles. Her 

Minorities 


amendment 

introduced 


A new amendment has been 
proposed by the SGA Congress 
to make the election process 
for Secretary of Minority 
Affairs more consistent with 
the procedure recommended 
by the SGA constitution. 

All amendments must 
appear before the public in 
public form before Congress 
may take action upon them 

The amendment states: 

Whereas, it is now and has 
been a practice in the past to 
elect the Secretary of Minority 
Affairs at the same time as 
the other officers of the 
Executive Branch of 
the Student Government 
Association. 

Be it therefore resolved, 
that the following sentence lie 
removed from section 7.1 of 
the Constituion: "A meeting of 
minority students shall be 
called by the SGA President 
the second Tuesday of April a I 
which time the minority 
students shall elect a 
Secretary of Minority 
Affairs." 


foil. Nit.i Pardue played a 
proper Patty, all knees and 
spicy niceness In fine voice. 
Bob Barm's blanket wonder 
Linus was most effective in his 
dark Saturday im . ,nng 
Dracula Stealing scenes on 
and off his doghouse hi 
plane, was Ed Phillips an 
ihropomorphic Snoopy, as 
smooth as a comic Robert 
Bedford Schroeder was 
reali/ed effectively by Tun 
Kadtke's smouldering baby 
Beethoven 

Also to Ik* congratulated on 
then contributions to two 
« apacity performances 
are Debbie Carrico, proper 
ties. Melissa Sugg, stage 
manager. Rippei Wilons. 
Sara Webb, dreg Roberts. 
Susan Phillips. Kathy Patten 
and Kalhie Neal Wilson 

Speaker 

scheduled 

Dr Russell Buhite. a 
specialist in the area of 
American foreign policy, will 
speak at UTM today and 
tomorrow 

Buhite will speak at 7:30 
tonight and at 9 am and I 
p.m. tomorrow All three 
addresses will take place in 
Room 206-209of the University 
Center 


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The Pacer, Martin, Tennessee. Thursday, May 6.1976 



CHARLES MARKET Communications 


program 
to get ITV lab equipment 


By RIC K NORTON 

Special Assignments Kditnr 

UTM will receive enough 
equipment from the soonto 
be defunct Instructional 
Televsion unit (ITV) to 
maintain its television 
production laboratories, 
according lo station manager 
Robert Carswell 

Carswell explained that the 
equipment in the ITV building 
is divided into two basic 
groups, thal belonging to the 
local area and thal belonging 
lo Ihe state department of 
education He said most of the 
equipment owned by the local 
area, such as Ihe schools, was 
basically desks and tables, 
although there were a few 
exceptions, but none of which 
should badly handicap the 
UTM com m unicat ions 
program 

Representatives from Nash¬ 
ville. as well as those who 
owned equipment in the 
building, met with Carswell 
Thursday where an inventory 
was presented with special 
restrictions placed on who 
could obtain what Carswell 
stated thal much of what is 
locally-owned might be lost, 
but that most everything 
state-owned could be kept by 
UTM. provided it was not 
taken back to Nashville. He 
said most everything state- 
owned would be left here, that 
is. everything that UTM 
requests 

According lo Carswell he 
has discussed the matter with 
Piovnsi Jimmy Trentham 
and Dr David Briody, 
director of communications, 
and the three decide that UTM 
would request only to keep the 
equipment necessary for 
laboratory use for the com¬ 
munications program There 
will be no requests made for 
the transmissions equipment, 
although parts of this might be 
left at UTM if it is not needed 
in other state wide facilities. 

"I would say that basically 
if the communications 
program needs a particular 
piece of equipment then they 
will be able to keep it if il is 
state-owned and the state 
decides that this equipment 
cannot be better used at 
another institution." Carswell 
explained "To my knowledge. 
UTM will only request 
equipment necessary for 
laboratory use." 

Carswell said that right now 
he felt the only vital pieces of 
machinery that UTM will 
probably lose will be the 
pedestals for the cameras and 
some of the lights He said, 
however, that ITV presently 
had older models of tripods 


lhal can be used for the 
cameras, and added there are 
presently three or more of 
these tripods that he knew of 
that could he used for camera 
purposes 

"I don't think there will be 
any change as far as 
production itself," he said 
"Everything should hopefully 
remain intact as far as 
laboratory material The key 
is not as much the stale right 
now but the local systems 
We're not sure exactly what 
they are going to want back 
and what they'll turn over to 


to UTM and what the state, in 
particular, was going lo leave 
here Regardless of who 
leaves what, he said he felt 
relatively sure that UTM 
would be granted all of its 
requests concerning the 
production laboratory 
equipment with the exception 
of the camera pedestals and 
some lights He included the 
iransmitting tower in the list 
of things which will probably 
stav at UTM The tower, 
formerly used bv presently 
defunct WUTM-FM. is 
locally owned by the county 
"It's going lo take hard 
work and imagination on 
someone's part to put all this 
together." Carswell stated. 


"Bui it can be done This could 
all be dated as the year one 
because UTM is now having to 
start all over as far as this 
particular aspect is con¬ 
cerned '' 

"This should be a real boost 
to the communications 
program." Briody stated 
"After all this is over the 
facility should be much more 
cohesive and centralized 
This will give the students a 
needed hands-on experience in 
television production and 
direction 

"This can be made into a 
first rate black white facility 
if we get all (hat the 
University is requesting." he 
cone luded 


NOW WE HAVE CUBED ICE 
COMPLETE LINE OF MIXERS 


He said he hoped to know 
most of this by May 17. as far 
as who are going to leave w hat 


International Week called 
‘successful’ by director 


sum pftok> t>v Wjn* 

Soccer sidestepper 

Despite falling to UT Knoxville by the score of 4-2, the UTM 
soccer team played the best game since they had played in the 
United Slates, according to team captain Anibal Valero. Last 
weekend's game, held behind G-H dorm, was attended by 
approximately 350 students The next game of the season is 
tentatively scheduled against Southwestern on Sunday <See 
story on page 5 1 


SPONSORED BY 


By RICK NORTON 
Special Xssignmrnts Editor 
UTM's recently concluded 
International Week was 
termed “successful," ac¬ 
cording to Dr John 
Eisterhold. director of 
International Programs 
“I am exceptionally pleased 
with the whole week," he said 
"I'm grateful to WUTM. The 
Pacer, the modern foreign 
language department, and 
special thanks to Vilma 
Robaina and Jenny Thorn¬ 
burg." 

Eisterhold stated that 
all aspects of the week-long 
event went well enough, with a 
minimum of problems He 
admitted that he was looking 


at the whole matter through 
"rose-colored” glasses, but 
that he was "awfully happy" 
with the entire week of events 

"The only real thing that 
went wrong with the entire 
week is that we lost the soccer 
match Saturday," he said. "It 
was a fantastic match 
though ” 

UTM lost the match 4-2 to 
the University of Tennessee at 
Knoxville, winners in six of 
their first seven games this 
season It was UTM’s first 
match of the season 

"My only other regret is 
that we had to turn so many 
people away at the banquet 
Monday night,” he continued 
"We had to turn away literally 


hundreds of people " 

He said the International 
Program would handle 
International Week next year 
also. Before this year, the 
modern foreign langauge 
department sponsored the T ““ v 
event but due to the illness of 
Dr. Muriel Tomlinson, plus a 
lack of time by the depart 
ment. International Programs BuhiteLecture 

was asked to take over 
Eisterhold said now that they 
knew they would sponsor the 
event next year. They would 
now have time to sit down frMl 
and plan out the event much 
more carefully 
“Our international students 
really fell good about the 
success of the event," he 
stated "This gave them an 
opportunity to showcase their 
culture We had several dozen 
international students ac¬ 
tively working 
"I just want to thank 
everyone who participated in 
Ihis event," he continued "I 
want to thank the students, the 
faculty, and everyone who Sll „ ajy 
helper! to make this a sue 

Life with Father" 

SGA movie. "The 
Apprenticeship©! Duddy Kravitz' 
ERA PRO and Cor 


Dinner Theatre. 
"Lite with Father" 
Delta Sigma Theta 


Senior Recital 

Jim Davis. Aaron Chamberlain 
AKA 


Chinese U S Relations 
Lecture 
Dinner Theatre 
"L<le with Father " 
Senior Recital 
Buddy Leach. 

Jell Harrington 


COLLEGE TRAINED MEN AND WOMEN 
WILL BE CONSIDERED TO SUPPLEMENT 
OUR PERMANENT STAFF IN DISTRICT 
OFFICES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES 
THESE POSITIONS ARE FULLTIME 
SUMMER JOBS. WE ARE SEARCHING FOR 
APPLICANTS WHO ARE AMBITIOUS 
DEPENDABLE & HARD WORKING. 
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
ADVANCEMENT 


Sorority to feature 
annual May singing 


Spring Develop 
Committee 
Alumni Council 


Paul Jeefc Library 
room 206. Univ 
Centgr' 


Dinner Theatre 
"Lite with Father' 


Gamma Sigma Sigma 
service sorority will sponsor 
their annual Ail-Sing on May 
15 at 7 p m. in the UTM 
Kieldhou.se, according to All- 
Sing Coordinator. Peggy 
Wright. 

Wright said that the theme 
lor this year's All-Sing would 
be “The Best of 75." 

"The songs that are sung 
will be songs that were either 
released or copywrited in 
1975,” Wright said She said 


most of the songs perlormcu 
would be 1975 hits. 

Tickets will go on sale for the 
event Monday. May 10 
They may be bought from anyt 
member of the service 
sorority There will also be a 
table set up in front of the 
cafeteria for tickets 
or they may lie purchased 
door. Tickets will be $1.00 for 
UTM students and $1 50 for 
others. 


Date 
selected 
for event 


EdNuMec Auditorium 
interfaith Center 


YOU MAY CONTINUE TO 
WORK ON A PART-TIME OR FULL-TIME BASES 
NEXT FALL IF YOUR DESIRE. DISTRICT 
OFFICE ADDRESS OR APPOINTMENT WITH 
OUR LOCAL MAN - CALL FOR ROBBIE AFTER 

9-5 M-F - 332-5434 


Monday 


Faculty Lunch 
Omega Ps» Phi Pearls 


Noon 

5 pm 


Interfeith Center 
room 20i. Univ 
Center 

room 20i. Univ Center 
room 206. Univ. 

Center 


Gamma Sigma Sigma 
APhiO 


By DKBHIK DICKSON 
Staff Writer 

Sunday. May 23 at 2 p.m 
lias been set as the lime for 
this year's annual Honor’s 
Day program 

"The annual Honor's Day 
Program gives recognition to 
students who have made 
outstanding achievements in 
scholarship and citizenship." 
Ihe program states. “Awards 
are also made to cadets who 
have excelled in the ROTC 
program." 

"Dr. (Charles i Ogilvie, 
associate professor of history, 
will give a small speech and 
about too awards will be 
presented. “ Dr. David 
Loebbaka. chairman of the 
Honor's Day selection com¬ 
mittee. stated "Fifty in 
dividual awards will be in¬ 
cluded." 


Pacer applications 
available for titles 


Open Forum 


room I32C. Univ. 

Center 

Ballroom, Univ. 

Center 
room 206. Univ. 

Center 
room 207. Univ. 
Center 


SGA installation 


UTM history and political 
science department, extension 
7825 

"Since The Pacer is not a 
part of the communications 
program, it is highly depen 
dent upon students who desire 
an opportunity to work with 
the newspaper for various 
reasons other than academic 
credit." Chesteen said. 
"Anyone with or without 
newspaper experience is 
encouraged to apply. All 
editorial positions carry 
stipends of various amounts." 


Applications are now being 
taken for editorial positions 
for The Pacer of 1976-77, ac¬ 
cording to present advisor 
Richard Chesteen. assistant 
professor of political science. 

Available positions for next 
year's paper are executive 
editor managing editor, news 
editor, assistant news editor, 
editorial page editor, special 
assignments editor, copy- 
editor, business manager, and 
sports editor 

Applications are to be 
turned into Chesteen in the 


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CHILI DOGS $.75 

CTJICKEN BASKET $ 1.75 

HOT DOG WITH FRIES $.65 

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EGG SANDWICH $.45 

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COFFEE 15 e /pellll 5 C MILK - 20 c ft 

TEA 25 e / free ref ; "< , . , . , 

Call ahead for quick pickup 587-2574 


Valuing Seminar 


room 207, Univ. 

Center 
room 207, Univ. 

Center 


Alpha Phi Alpha 


Bug Rally planned 
for parking lot run 


The third annual Kappa 
Alpha Order Carry and Cram 
Hug Rally will be held 
Thursday. May 27 at 5 p.m. on 
the football stadium parking 
lot 

The proceeds from the 
event, which will feature both 
a women's and men s division, 
will go the the American 
Cancer Society. 

Teams for the event must 
bring their own Volkswagen lo 


the stadium lot In the men's 
event, the men must pick up 
the Volkswagen and carry il 
clown the field and then load 
into it with all doors and 
windows shut and drive back 
to the starting line Women 
must push their Volkswagen 
down the field and then load in 
with windows and door closed 
The entry fee will be *5 per 
learn and admission is tree. 
Entry forms are presently 
lieing sent to all University 
organizations.but independent 
teams are welcome and can 
obtain entry blanks at the 
University Center Infor 
mation Desk next week 
"We are in the process now 
of soliciting donations for 
prizes for the event and aren’t 
certain about what they will 
lie. but we do have enough 
obligations at the present to 
promise a keg of beer to first 
place in each division." Joe 
Washiewicz. chairman for the 
event, said. 


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VIP with academic panel (Law P-42) 

BrafcSBg- . 


Lone 

STAR 


The Pacer. Martin. Teqpessee. Thursday. May 6,1976 

Forfeit mars final ga 


Long campaign concludes 


I-ambuth on a 9-0 forfeit Mike 
Williams had thrown a one 
hitter and Walter Glass had 
I wo hits for the Pacers 
After a squad meeting on 
Tuesday afternoon. Coach- 
windbigler announced th^ 
awards for this season Senior 
All-American Walter Glass 
was named the team's Most 
Valuable Player for the 
second consecutive season 
Glass led the team in several 
categories, including baiting 
average (.436). stolen bases 
281. homeruns 18), triples 
(8). RBI's (251 and total bases 
'99i Another senioi . Mike 
W illiams. was named the Most 
Valuable Pitcher He led the 
mound squad with a 5-1 
record. 2.09 KRA, and two 
saves. The Best Defensive 
Player award, for the second 
consecutive year, went to 
shortstop Harry McLeod 
McLeod, a junior, contributed 
to a large number of the 
Pacers' 23 double plays In 
announcing the award. Coach 
Windbigler called McLeod 
"the brains of the squad " 


vantage heading into the 
seventh UTM had men on 
second and third with one out 
us Steve Riccardo lofted a 
long fly to left With the 
runners tagging up. it ap 
peared the catcher had never 
had possession of the ball on 
the throw home, and both 
runners crossed the plate 
However umpire Bud Sikes 
ruled that the catcher had 
lagged the first riuyier for the 
Ihird out Pacer rtach Dick 
Windbigler protested the call 
and was ejected Irom the 
This past Monday, the game As he attempted to 

Pacers went to Lambuth for a restore order to the UTM 

single game to conclude the bench, the umpire ruled thal 

season Seven Pacer errors he had not left the field within 

over the first five innings had the 60-second time limit: thus 

given lamhuth a 2-0 ad- Ihe game was awarded to 


lielder David Belote's leaping 
one-handed catch in the 
seventh stopped a Livingston 
rally and gave the Pacers a 5-4 
Victory Danny Mitchell tool* 
the win to close out his season 
with with a 6-6 mark 
In the second game. 
Uvingston stopped the Pacer 
victory string at 5 with a 6-2 
defeat of UTM Senior 
Tommy Gray was stuck with 
(he loss to drop his mark to 5-5 
on the year The Pacers saw 
their final GSC mark fall to 5- 


Alvin Smalls <31 shouts instructions in running exciting 28-21 victory that was not decideduniil y 
liack Richard Giebcig 1 24 > as safeties I tot id the final seconds Smalls totalled 26n yard-on f 
Williams <351 and Clay Rlalack'34 1 close in fni offense and scored Ihrec touchdown- i 
Ihe tackle Smalls led the Orange lean In an 


Quarterbacks steal show 
in Orange - Blue contest 


UTM soccer team loses, 
awaits Knoxville rematch 


The Pacers finished the 
season with a 23-16 overall 
defense. Southeastern mark With a strong nucleus of 
Ixiuisiana the biggest players Ireshmen and juniors, the 
as well as the best runner Pacers should have a strong 
i Horace Belton who has squad next season 
gained over 240(1 yards in the 

last two years), and Austin In his two years as head 
Peay should have the fastest baseball coach. Richard 
team. Windbigler has compiled a 

"Defense will be our strong record of 46-30 These are two 
point. MacIntyre said "We re of the best seasons a Pacer 
looking forward to the up- baseball team has ever pul 
coming season.'' bag^tp-back. 


"The crowd was superb; 
they really supported us and 
we personally want to thank 
Ihem." Valero said 
Becky Smith, a freshman, 
won a soccer ball as an at¬ 
tendance prize, and she 
donated it to the soccer team— 
Donations collected at the- 
game totalled approximately 
$50. according to Dr John 
Eisterhold, director of 
International Programs, 
i See picl ure on page four' 


the early deficit 
Pedro Defipo, UTK eoach, 
was highly complimentary of 
the UTM team as well as the 
crowd He said that in the 
entire Southeastern Con 
ference circuit no team had a 
larger or more enthusiastic- 
representation from\ the 
student body at soccer games 
than UTM He added that the 
largest crowd at'a college 
soccer game was about 70 
people 


this season will be played at 
night to see if attendance is 
lietter than in the daytime He 
also said that it is very 
important for the players to 
remain healthy until practice 
for the season opener at 
Southeastern Ixiuisiana 
On the schedule. McIntyre 
feels that Tennessee State will 
have the best players overall. 
Jacksonville State the best 


By II ANK W ILLI AMSON 
staff Writer 

After falling victim to UT 
Knoxville 4-2 before a crowd of 
approximately 350 students 
last Saturday, the UTM soccer 
team .tentatively has a game 
scheduled against South¬ 
western Sunday 
The Southwestern game has 
not yet been finalized and the 
site for the contest is also 
undetermined 

"1 think the Knoxville game 
was the best game we’ve 
played since lieing in Ihe 
United States," team captain 
Anibal Valero said "They are 
a hell of a good team, but I 
think we have just as good a 
team We gave the game away 
when we missed three penalty 
shots, it is unforgiveable that 
we didn't score on them " 

In thy first half. UTM failed 
to convert on three penalty 
kicks, which are similar to the 
extra point in football 
Knoxville dominated the half 
by scoring three goals and 
preventing UTM from any 
other serious scoring op 
poitpuities 

Knoxville was a well- 
seasoned team and they were 
able to convert .their shots in 
the first half," coach Steve 
Shanklin remarked 'We had 
the advantage but we missed 
three penalty kicks while they 
converted theirs. Knoxville 
was 100 per cent improved 
from last year's SEC tour 
- itament." 

Shanklin explained that he 
tell Ihe team had lost their 
finesse, since the last game 
UTM«*)laved was in October 
1975^ 

"We lost the game, but we 
look forward to playing them 
again in Ihe regular lall 
.season." Shanklin com 
mented. 

UTM controlled the second 
half with scores by Luis 
Farias and Jesus M 
Rodriguez, but could not erase 


hitting defensive affair with 
Williams' touchdown being 
the only score of the half 

"I thought the crowd was 
good despite the adverse 
weather conditions," 
MacIntyre remarked. ”1 do 
(eel that we’ll be much better 
next fall." 

Commenting on a variety 
of issues, the coach said that 
the first three home games 


By W ARREN ECTOR 
Sports Editor 

Henry "Sweetcake" 
Williams scored the winning 
touchdown for the Orange 
with 29 seconds remaining, 
but to the crowd of about 2000 
it was quarterbacks Alvin 
Smalls lOrange) and Bill 
Staehs i Blue> that provided 
Ihe thrills in the 28-21 Orange- 
Blue game 

Smalls rushed for 158 yards 
on 17 carries and scored three 
touchdowns; he also com¬ 
pleted 12 of 23 passes for 102 
yards. Staehs ran for 54 yards 
and three touchdowns as well 
for another 60 


Annual rodeo approaches, 
to feature Walt Garrison 


as passing 
yards 

"They had a lot of fun," 
Coach George MacIntyre 

quipped 

MacIntyre commented on 
some individual performance 
by saying that running back 
Larry Washington (89 yardsi 
llayed well and has been most 
mpressive this spring He 
said that Smalls played like 
be is able after putting in a 
jerifld pf 20 days con- 
-entratlng on football 
MacIntyre also had words of 
praise for receiver Billy 
McDaniel, Staehs, safety 
David Williams, defensive end 
Bubba Williams, receiver 
Ronald George, and the rest of 
the team 

The Blue team took 
possession of the ball first and 
drove 75 yards for the game’s 
initial points with Bill Staehs 
scoring from eight yards out. 
UTM's soccer-style kicker. 
Matt Golden, added the extra 
point for a 7-0 Blue lead. 
However, after the Orange got 
the ball on their own 35, it only 
took 42 seconds and two plays 
to tie the game Henry 
Williams ran for ten yards, 
and Alvin Smalls kept the ball 
on an option play for 55 yards 
and the score A Mickey 
Hamilton PAT tied the game. 
There was no other scoring in 
(he first quarter. 

The second quarter saw four 
TDs and 28 points scored 
Smalls scored his second 
touchdown on a one-yard 
sneak following a 12 -play 
drive Hamilton's extra point 
w as blocked by James Collins 
Twopossessionslater, the Blue 
retaliated with Staehs 
tallying on a one-yard sneak of 
his own. Golden's PAT gave 
the Blue their second lead of 
the contest 14-13. Following 
the kickoff. Small lead the 
Orange on another touchdown 
drive which he capped by 
racing 25 yards for the score. 
Smalls passed to McDaniel for 
a 21-14 lead After regaining 
possession of the ball, the 
Orange had a pass by running 
back Richard Giebeig, in¬ 
tercepted by Jack Chancy , who 
returned it to the Orange 
eight yard line. Staehs scored 
on the first play, and Golden's 
PAT knotted the score at 
halftime 

The final half was hard 


important trade shows such as 
the NATD Convention and the 
Company's Super Bowl Gala 
for distributors, along with 
sidekick Nick Bunnicnnti 
of the Miami Dolphins 
Garrison's love for rodeo 


report," Landry added "He 
played lor us when nobody 
else would have tried " 

He was the third leading 
rusher- in Cowboy history, 
averaging over four yards jh-i 
carry, and ranks fifth in all 
time pass receiving, 
averaging over ten yards a 
catch He was invited to play 
in three pro bowl games 

Garrison nowdives with his 
wife Pam and then two sons 
in Dallas. Texas, where he will 
make " his official 

headquarters ' His favorite 
hobby is whittling, an art he 
learned from his father and 
has been practicing for six 
years. 

Garrison will be ac- 
c o m p a n i e d by 
Red Springer, in charge ol 
governmental affairs for the 
U.S Tobacco Company, and 
Hill Morris. Divisional 
Manager for the U.S. Tobacco 
Company. 

Hoy' said that Garrison. 
Springer, and Morris were all 
coming to UTM to help 
promote collegiate level rodeo 
as well as advertisement for 
the Skoall Copenhagen U S 
Tobacco Company 

Their public appearances 
will begin Tuesday at the 
press conference and continue 
throughout the week 

^There'fSa 7 ^, 
• difference!!!. 


and football began early He 
was born in Denton. Texas, 
July 23, 1944. In high school at 
Lewisville, Texas, he was on 
the rodeo team for two years 
and was Honorable Mention 
All-District in football 

A two-lime All Big Eight 
Choice at Oklahoma State, he 
says he crossed the Red River 
Irom Lewisville, Texas 
because "OSU was the only 
oiie to offer me a scholar 
ship." 

"My daddy once told me 
that if they don't want you or 
you're not good enough, come 
on back home," he said "But 
.if you quit because you're not 
lough enough, just keep going 
North." * 

He ended his college career, 
with appearances in the East 
West Shrine Game, the 
Coach's All-American Con¬ 
test, the Senior Bowl, and the 
College All-Star Game 

Garrison majored in 
veterinary medicine, but 
lound time to participate for 
two years in N IRA events a 
member of the Oklahoma 
State Rodeo Team. He still 
steer wrestles on the RCA 
professional circuit, par 
ticipating in 25-30 rodeos a 
yekr. " 

He joined the Dallas 
Cowboys in I960 In gi 
descriptive manher. Coach 
Tom Landry speaks of 
Garrison as being a "solid 
starter who performed con 
sistently well." 

"He's the kind fi\ guy who 
never showed up on the injury 


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P»g<? Six 


The Pacer. Martin. Tennessee. Thursday. May 6, IM 7 # 



nnn|uoctan|ut4nnn 
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nUOUL'HUHH| JIOLIUU 


uuuuu uuuluuua 
UklUU UUUUU UI1UU 
■■uuu UUU LKIUl'J 
uuuuuu iiuau aaa 
Buoot'iuo oaciaaaa 
anu aoau auu ona 
unuu moo utinaa* 

UUUU UUUUU ULIUU 
■Buuunuict itULUIl 
uuuuultiuutiuuann 
uuuuulLiiiLKiontiau 
uuuuuluuLiJuluutJ 


OFF ON 

SELECTED PARTS 


Campus record set 
in law acceptances 


GUTTMAN'S DEPT. STORE 


ACROSS AS ObvorvorS 

1 Won ot ins dossly 

47 Firm 

6 Legal men firmly 

Abb' 51 Hebnuai 

10 Knocks drinkers 

14 Grown up 52Vewl s|*b 

15 Hindu 54 Cause 10 

Olympus move 

16 Nigerian 58 Cravats 

native Ve» 58 Priest 

17 In no wav 61 Hole 

18 Nobleman 62 At first 

19 Accept 63 Fabled giant 

20 Full of npe 64 General rule 

eggs 85 Soaks 

22 Shark or 66 Change the 

tiger decor 

24 Tartan s 67 Bottoms of 

friends ships 

26 Garrulous DOWN 

people 1 Resounded 

27 One paymg 2 Polish river 

attention 3 City of Fiji 

31 Mrs Equivs 4 Moving 

lent platform 

32 O'Artegnan's 5 Stars and 
friend 

33 Holding 6 One couloml 

devices per sec 

35 of 1812 7 Pour 

38 Isolated rock 8 Something 

39 Work special 

trousers 9 Family 

40 Window monickers 

facet 10 Second 

41 Biblical filming 

pronoun 11 Lessen 

42 Revealed 12 Gambling 

43 Five Prefix game 

44 Male bird 13 Prophets 


WOULD LIKE TO SHOW 
THEIR APPRECIATION 
FOR THE STUDENTS 
AND FACULTY BUSINESS 
BY GIVING 

A PAIR OF LEVIS AND BLOUSE 
TO AN OUTSTANDING STUDENT 
FOR THE MONTH OF MAY 
GLENDA SWIERS 
HAS BEEN SELECTED. 
HEX DUNN. MANAGER 


! B> KICK NORTON 

Special Assignments Kditor 
I'TM's number ol law school 
applicants and accepted 
'll applicants has broken all 
records within the period of 
the last six years, according to 
l)r Ted .Mosch. associate 
a professor of political science 
Mosch said thus far he had 
been told of roughly 20 ac 
ieptances from UTM while 

I around 35 to 40 applications 
had been submitted He ex 
plained that the majority ol 
these acceptances had been to 
Memphis State University, 
the University of Tennessee at 
Knoxville, and Vanderbilt 
University, as well as others 
f Some applications have also 
been submitted to Ivy league 
schools 

Mosch explained that these 
previous figures were on!> 
approximations but that they 
* were reliable in the sense that 
these were the numbers of 
\ students he had cc .itacted or 
had l>een contained by He 
stated that these fi »ures are 10 
| to 15 students greater than 
that of last year 
According to Mosch. UTM s 
, success in this area is because 
, of the numerous amount of 
trips which are taken to dif 
lerent law schools by students, 
along with other special 
events such as speakers 
“UTM is one of the only 
schools lo have a lot of pre law 
• speakers." he said. “We also 
I get many of our faculty 
I members to make presen 
tations. We annually make 


asset lo the law students on 
campus was the Pre-legal 
Society, sponsored by Mosch 
“The Pre legal Society is a 
means lo go ahead and 
stimulate interest." he staled 

“The legal society has been 
able to get several guest 
speakers who have been 
valuable to our law students 
There’s been a lot of 
concern with the legal areas 
becoming overcrowded and 
saturated,'* he continued 
“This society is helping our 
students in many ways.” 

He said that manv people 
have thought that the law 
careers were beginning to 
level off bul he felt that in 
terest was increasing here 
UTM student acceptance into 
law school, according to 
Mosch. is very good at this 
point, at leasl. better than it 
has been in the last six years 

In conclusion, he thanked 
many persons who had been 
beneficial to the pre law 
program in that they had been 
very cooperative as far as 
public speaking and events of 
this nature In the list he in¬ 
cluded professors Bob Hearn 
and Clayburn Peeples, and 
Nick Dunnigan. director ol 
development 


42 OiMppcovM 
vocally 

43 B*gn»m« 
ir hockey 

44 Sivage 
boie* 

46 The 
Republicans 
Abb' 

47 Behind in 
time 

48 Black 
French 

49 Tuft 

50 Blockade 
53 Rendered 

hog fat 

55 Corn bread 

56 Chemical 
compound 

57 Eye pari 
60 New form 

Prefix 


21 European 
nation Abbf 

23 Trees 

25 Divide into 
parts 

27 Terminal 

28 Skm 

sensation 

29 Lighi 
carriage 

30 St Law 
fence for 
one 

34 Lateral 
parts 

35 Scepter 

36 In front of 
Prefix 

37 Study 

39 Part of New 
foundlend 

40 Characters 
in a play 


Martial maneuvering 

As part of the International Week events, a demonstration of 
martial arts was given in the University Center Thursday 
night. Students familar with the style and form of the Eastern 
art exhibited several defense stances, kicks, and throws for 
inleresled viewers 


JLhings to do ‘ 

WHEN YOU VISIT 
MEXICO. 


Committee submits report 
on computer registration 


Look at the sky. 

Go into an elevator and press 3. 

Have lunch. 

Ride in a taxicab or bus. 

Ask a person for directions to the nearest 
post office. 

Have breakfast. 

Walk on the sidewalk. 

Chuckle. 

Have a shot of Jose Cuervo. 

Deliver a lecture to the Mexican bail 
National Assembly on the , y i 

historical significance and potential Iw 
peacetime uses of the nectarine, J ~ 
as seen through the eyes of Keats. 1. j 


with how many terminals . 
and things of that sort " 

The preliminary report 
pointed oul "likely" 
procedures, such as the 
registration being carried out 
during a three week period 
late in the preceding quarter. 

The students will possibly 
register in reverse order of the 
number of hours carried 
igraduate students, seniors, 
juniors, sophomores, fresh 
men-in that order I with the 
exception that first -quarter- 
freshmen and first-quarter 
transfer students would 
register early. The 
registration will be accom 
plished through the terminals 
directly into the computer 
data banks, but the students 
make alt the scheduling 
decisions The compuler will 
not make any scheduling 
decisions 

The student will then be 
allowed to pay fees at the 
business office anytime 
between his registration and 
the end of the second day of 
classes of the new quarter 

"We have surveyed all of 
the universities in Tennessee: 
all of the four-year schools, 
and a couple of community 
colleges." Stone said "This is 
the system used at East- 


B> ED KOKDKI 
Editorial Page Editor 

A preliminary report of an 
\d Hoc committee to study 
computer-aided registration 
was presented to Tuesday's 
Academic Senate meeting 
The report, presented for 
information only, represents 
Ihe present consensus of 
opinion among the members 
of the committee 
"This is very close to what 
we believe to be our summer 
report, but we will make that 
this summer at the summer 
meeting of the Senate,” Dr. 
Dewitt Stone, committee 
chairman, said to the Senate 
"We are not down to the point 
in actual details: in terms of 
precisely in which building. 


Tennessee State College and 
Jacksonville Community 
•College, which are the schools 
we (eel are really in a class by 
themselves Almost 
everybody else is dealing with 
boxes of cards and a gym¬ 
nasium. like we do ." 

In other Senate business, 
nominations for next year’s 
Senate Offices were closed, 
with two candidates for each 
of the three positions 

For the office of chairman: 
Dr. Richard Chesteen, 
assistant professor of 
political science: and Dr. 
Dewitt Stone, professor of 
chemistry are vying for the 
positor. The candidates for 
vice chairman are Betfye 
(files, director of women’s 
nhlelics; and Dr Joe Devi- 
lis. assistant professor of 
c leni.-ntary and secondary 
education Dr Louis Mauldin, 
assistant professor of 
psychology and religious 
studies, is running for 
secretary against Dr. Rodney 
Everhart, assistant professor 
of e lementary and secondary 
Education. 

The voting ballots will be 
sent oul to the Senate within 
a few days and the results will 
be announced at the next 
meeting. 


Placement news 


The Office ol Cooperative Education and Placement announces the following 
interview 


MAJOR 

Bus. Admin (some Engineering) 
Enginnering (some Business) 


Kell wood 
Trenton, Tennessee 


* 17 Dairymen. Inc Agriculture 

Paducah, Kentucky 

Anyone interested .n interviewing with the above should contact the Olfice ol 
Cooperal.vc Education and Placement, Room 260. University Center All ap 
pomtme-nfs should be made at least 24 hours tn advance 


'Rubberized ’ game 
expands to campus 


Show 

slated 


JOSE CUERVO* TE< 
>TTLED BY C WS. I 


IUILA 90 PROOF 

IEUBLEIN INC HARTFORD CONN 


Hair Rubber, a game ol 
skill that originated on the 
beaches of Georgia and South 
Carolina, will he brought to 
the UTM campus by the Park 
and Recreation classes with a 
demonstration to be held 
Monday afternoon at 5 bet¬ 
ween the University Center 
and Ellington Hall 
The ultimate goal for the 
Park and Recreation classes 
is tp have the game integrated 
, into the intramural sports 
3^ competition. The purpose of 
the demonstration is to ex 
^ plain the game to all in- 
terested persons and gauge 


IMPORTED AND 


the amount of campus in¬ 
terest 

The game is played with 
half of a rubber ball that, 
when whole, is a little larger 
than a baseball No equipment 
such as gloves is required to 
play the game. A team con¬ 
sists of five players, with the 
players rotating their 
positions each inning as in 
volleyball The most essential 
things needed to get a game 
going are foul lines, and home 
plates no other bases are 
needed in the game that can 
last either five or seven in¬ 
nings 


An open horse show for 
riders in this area will be held 
at the fairgrounds in Paris 
Sunday beginning at 2 p.m. 

The show is being sponsored 
by the Block and Bridle Club 
of UTM 


Cuts Prices On Ports and Service! 


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STEPHEN STILLS 
ELTON JOHN 


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CHARLIE DANIELS 


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OIL and OIL FILTER SPECIAL | ^INEWE-W SPECIAL__ 


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OfFER WHO DURING MAT iikJ JURE. 197$ * 

REGULAR PRICE $59 10 jg 

MUFFLER ASSEMBLY SPECIAL 


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TOTAL SPECIAL PRICE 
AS DESCRIBED_ 


RAMSEY LEWIS 


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these speculs be mule by either cash, personal choc*. Master chute or Bankamencord 

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OPEN MON FRI 7 a m to 5 p m 
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VILLAGE SHOPPING CENTER 
MARTIN, TENN. 


Coll Service Mpr Tim Milter Si7 3141 tor appointment